Iranian Politics, Religion and History in Among the Ruins

March 7, 2017 Book Review, reviews 1

I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book nor the content of my review.

Iranian Politics, Religion and History in Among the RuinsAmong the Ruins (Rachel Getty & Esa Khattak, #3) by Ausma Zehanat Khan
Published by Minotaur Books on February 14th 2017
Genres: Fiction, Mystery
Pages: 368
Source: complimentary review copy
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Reading Diverse Books

I’m embarrassed to admit that while my children were young, my life was consumed with taking care of them and not with paying attention to the world. It is only since they’ve grown up that I’ve become interested in the world around me.  As I’ve immersed myself in the news and lately, politics, I find myself drawn to reading diverse books.

History has always been fascinating to me. I find history a little easier to stomach as opposed to current events … with hindsight and all! In Among the Ruins, the opportunity to learn both historical context and current events taking place in Iran simply helped to add to my love of this series.

About the Book

Esa Khattak is on leave touring Iran after the deadly confrontation in The Language of Secrets involving his sister. While in Iran his first two weeks are spent visiting historical places; however, in his third week he is met with secret notes passed in fruit baskets and clandestine meetings with a woman who erroneously uses blackmail as a persuasion technique. Khattak is recruited/persuaded into finding a popular singer with dual citizenship from Canada and Iran. It is believed she’s been captured and held in the prison notorious for torturing political prisoners.

Among the Ruins is the darkest of the books in the Khattak series. The injustices performed on those who speak out are horrifying and the things unimaginable nightmares are made of. Ausma does not delve into gratuitous graphic description. Every word held meaning, and if Ausma’s intent was to make the reader feel the dichotomy between the hopelessness and hope of many Iranians, then she certainly succeeded.

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Recommended For

I hope you will give this series a try, especially if you are looking to broaden your reading by incorporating diverse books. If you like a satisfying mystery steeped in social injustice then this series is definitely for you! Be sure to read the books in order!

Book 1 The Unquiet Dead

Book 2 The Language of Secrets

and I’ve read through Ausma’s social media posts that book 4 is almost completed! Yay!

Side Note

A couple of years ago my daughter visited Morocco. While I know it’s not Iran by any means, the ornate buildings and rich colors my daughter captured in pictures give me a sense of the landscape Ausma writes about in Among the Ruins. I cannot believe I’m saying this, but while reading Among the Ruins I so wanted to visit Iran and see the dusty streets, hear the cacophony of sounds and meet the Iranian people written about so beautifully.

Standard transportation method in Morocco

Standard transportation method in Morocco

 

Moroccan Riad aka traditional courtyard palace remodeled into a boutique hotel

Moroccan Riad aka traditional courtyard palace remodeled into a boutique hotel

 

Opulent traditional European bathroom in Morocco

Opulent traditional European bathroom in the riad

 

Tannery located in Morocco - bird poo is used to tan the leather

Tannery located in Morocco – bird poo is used to tan the leather

 

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