Posts Categorized: Book Review

Nonfiction November: Nontraditional Forms & Mini-Views

November 21, 2015 Book Review, Book Talk 8

Nonfiction-November-2015-300x300

Are you a fan of nonfiction? What’s your favored form? This week for Nonfiction November we are discussing nontraditional forms of the genre. You can learn more about Nonfiction November in my introductory post  or through these lovely hostesses: Katie at Doing Dewey, Kim at Sophisticated Dorkiness, Becca at I’m Lost in Books, and Leslie at Regular Rumination.  This week is hosted by Becca at I’m Lost in Books.

While there are numerous nontraditional forms of nonfiction my favorite is the audiobook. I daresay over 75% of the audiobooks I have are nonfiction. Although I’m fairly picky about the narrators. For example, Brené Brown’s books have had some fantastic narrators. BUT, I’ve watched both of her Ted Talks enough times to only expect her voice to come through the speakers.  The same with Andy Stanley’s books. I’ve been listening to his program Your Move every Sunday night for years. So when I hear a stranger reciting The Principle of the Path or The Grace of God it just does not come across well {for me}.

So on to a few books I’ve really enjoyed.

Quiet the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talkingQuiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain. I am such a champion for this book.  For most introverts, this book is a validation and a cheerleader ~ a validation for the good {and not so great} quirks that we introverts share and a cheerleader for celebrating the special brand of leadership we bring to the table. For anyone who is an introvert, knows an introvert or loves an introvert this book is a fabulous resource.

 

Yes PleaseYes, Please by Amy Poehler. I feel like I’ve been living under rock. Who knew Amy Poehler was so darn funny! Narrated by Amy Poehler herself, this audiobook gets you up close and personal with the girl next door. She does have a few added narrators that chime in, which at times adds to the performance and others, becomes a bit disconcerting.  Amy’s development and dedication to  Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls is so inspirational and makes me love her more. APSG is “……dedicated to helping young people cultivate their authentic selves. We emphasize intelligence and imagination over “fitting in.” We celebrate curiosity over gossip. We are a place where people can truly be their weird and wonderful selves.”  Overall, this audiobook rocks! Inspiring, positive, and most definitely, smart.

 

is everyone hanging out without meIs Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling. Truly my first introduction into comic memoir. Narrated by Mindy. I only listened to this one while walking so I would stay motivated to walk. It’s not that there were really that many profound moments, more that Mindy and I were ‘hanging out in a coffee shop’ and she was regaling me with her life story. Entertaining, humorous and engaging.

 

its what i doNot conducive to audio so I have this next one in hardback. This nonfiction is through photography and narrative: It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War by Lynsey Addario.  An engrossing storyteller both through the written word and with her photographs, Addario’s memoir is a must-read {and this is from someone who has never been a big fan of memoir!}. Her compassion and empathy are apparent in each photograph she publishes. If you read the New York Times you’ve most likely seen her photos. If you are on Instagram look up her account – stunning, heartbreaking and oh so real. This is nonfiction at its best. For a sampling of her work visit LynseyAddario.com

I’d love to know ~ where do you stand on nonfiction? Do you have a favored medium?

AND, if you could, share a few humorous nonfiction audios I should be on the lookout for.

signature

 

 

 

 

Divider

Book Review: The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

November 19, 2015 Book Review 4

I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book nor the content of my review.

Book Review: The Magic Strings of Frankie PrestoThe Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom
Published by Harper on November 10th 2015
Genres: Fiction
Pages: 512
Source: complimentary review copy
AmazonIndieBound
Goodreads

 

Having read all of Mitch Albom’s books, I was looking forward to his newest release, The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto.  Mitch Albom has a way with storytelling that can completely immerse one into the lives of his characters.  His novel The Five People You Meet in Heaven I still hand out to friends and loved ones. It’s one of those books I’m an immense champion for and believe everyone should read.  along with Have a Little Faith. oh, and Tuesdays With Morrie. Haha! can you tell I love his books?

 

The secret is not to make your music louder, but to make the world quieter.

World-renowned musician, Frankie Presto, has just passed away in the most public of fashions – was it murder? or something else entirely?  “Music,” as the narrator, takes the opportunity to interview several important guests to Frankie Presto’s funeral {and influential in his life} sharing the story of Frankie’s life – how he became the musician and the man.

The book is filled with music references to both the actual playing of music and the musicians beloved by many. If you play music or just enjoy listening to music, especially classical, then you’ll feel right at home amongst the pages.  The entire book is a metaphor as to how music has the ability to heal.

Do not let go of your own music, chava. Or you will let go of yourself.

The storytelling aspect of The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto is in typical Albom genius.  Each chapter leaves you wanting to learn more. Albom has the ability to reveal the motivations and inner recesses of the mind in a way that keeps you quickly turning the pages; however……personally, I did not like the narrator.  Music as the narrator was a bit confusing and frustrating and the music references went right over my head.  The story is great. The life lessons are superb. It’s simply the narrator did not work for me.

Have you read a book you expected to love but found the narrator to be annoying or obtrusive?

To see what other bloggers had to say about The Magic Strings follow along the blog tour.

Many thanks to TLC Book Tours for inclusion in the Book Tour!

tlc tour host

Divider

Reading with YaYa: What Pet Should I Get + Free Printable

November 8, 2015 Book Review 2

Reading with YaYa: What Pet Should I Get + Free PrintableWhat Pet Should I Get? by Dr. Seuss
Published by Random House Children's Books on July 28th 2015
Genres: Children, Picture Books
Pages: 48
Source: purchased
AmazonIndieBound
Goodreads

 

Would you believe the Little Monkey is four now! And so so smart and clever. Here’s just a few of our most recent conversations:

YaYa, let’s go to Chick-fil-a so I can share a milkshake with you. . .” and play in the indoor playground for hours.

YaYa, I don’t have markers those colors. Can we get those so you and I can color together?” I’ve only got every color under the sun except that particular shade of red…and red is our favorite color…

YaYa, will you read this book to me?” while climbing up into my lap, snuggling in and patiently waiting for the book to begin…who could resist?

Our latest book is the recently published What Pet Should I Get? by Dr. Seuss. This book was discovered in a box of Dr. Seuss’s things while his wife and secretary were cleaning out his office. If you read One Fish, Two Fish, you’ll recognize the brother and sister duo.  In What Pet Should I Get? the pair are off to the pet store together to pick out a pet. Should we get a bird? a dog? a yent? and so on.

The beginning starts off strong, but about half-way through the story lags. It did not seem to be quite up to par with Dr. Seuss’s normal hilarious and off-the-wall antics. The underlying moral and message is not as clear and concrete in this book as it is in say, The Grinch Who Stole Christmas or even Are You My Mother.  The main message seems to be “just make up your mind!”

With that said, we still enjoyed reading the book and discussed everything from having a new pet dinosaur to a new pet snail. Fortunately, we are an hour away from the pet store, so no new pets were welcomed into the home 😉

For this book we completed the printable I’ve added below. We had a lot of fun imagining our own dream pet.  In a ‘you’re special’ package I mailed to my nieces to congratulate them on their new baby brother, I included the book, the printable + crayons, and this clay.  It’s a great method for tactile learning and another opportunity to foster imagination.

Let me know if you try out the book & the printable or send me photos on Instagram! I’d love to see what your kiddos or grand-kiddos create!

what pet should i get printable

what-pet-should-i-get-printable

Stacy

Divider

What does The Shining Have to do with The Night Sister?

October 2, 2015 Book Review 2

I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book nor the content of my review.

What does The Shining Have to do with The Night Sister?The Night Sister by Jennifer McMahon
Published by Doubleday on August 4th 2015
Genres: Fiction, Thriller
Pages: 322
Format: Hardcover
Source: complimentary review copy
Amazon
Goodreads

 

The first and only time I saw the movie “The Shining” I got to the part with the little kid on the tricycle and had to leave the room. . .I’m a huge scaredy cat when it comes to horror.  Add a creepy hotel and Jack Nicholson and to this day I have nightmares of “Red Rum!”

But. I’m human enough to thoroughly enjoy scaring myself to death. Having read The Winter People by Jennifer McMahon I knew I had to read her latest, The Night Sister.  Set in a creepy motel in rural Vermont with a replica of the London Tower at the entrance, The Night Sister has location, location, location in spades.  The setting drew me in and swept me along even more so than the characters.  Jennifer McMahon is a master at setting up an atmosphere of spooky without depending on blood and gore.

I was reminded of the old “Dark Shadows” episodes while I was reading The Night Sister – well, “Dark Shadows” and “The Shining!”  The book gives you that sense of dark and foreboding.  The characters were lightly drawn but engaging.  At times it was a little difficult to keep up with who was who but the plot kept me flipping pages as fast as I could.

If you’re looking for a creepy, atmospheric, plot-driven novel for your October reads, definitely pick up The Night Sister.  Then come back and tell me at one point you figured out who killed the family in the opening pages!

Linking up to Jenn’s Bookshelves for Murder, Monsters, Mayhem and the R.I.P. X challenge.

R.I.P. X

Many thanks to Doubleday Books for the review copy.

[Tweet “What does The Shining have to do with The Night Sister? “]

Divider

Secrets Revealed in The Admissions

September 7, 2015 Book Review 5

I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book nor the content of my review.

Secrets Revealed in The AdmissionsThe Admissions by Meg Mitchell Moore
Published by Doubleday on August 18th 2015
Genres: Fiction
Pages: 320
Source: complimentary review copy
AmazonIndieBound
Goodreads

 

The Admissions reveals the inner-workings of an upscale family living in a prized suburb of San Francisco.  Seventeen year old Angela is the beloved first-born to Nora and Gabe.  She’s been groomed since the age of two for a college career at Harvard.  When the story begins Angela has just begun her senior year of high school.  She is the anticipated valedictorian, runs competitive cross-country, participates in a myriad of extra-curricular activities and is getting her college application ready to submit.  Ten year old Cecily is a talented Irish dance competitor and the peacemaker of the family.  Eight year old Maya is in second grade, but she still cannot read, much to her family’s chagrin.

With each chapter focusing on a different character, The Admissions slowly builds to a denouement that leaves no one in the family unscathed.  Thoroughly enjoyable, shocking on some accounts ~ did you know that some high school students and their parents hire summer overseers to plan the best use of the student’s summer? To the point of recommending a student bypass family vacation so he or she can squeeze in one more activity that will look good on college applications?

Although I’m a huge fan of long books, this one came in at only 320 pages but felt longish.  Normally the longer the better, but in this case, I wanted to know what happened to the family.  The introduction is shocking and left me anxious to discover what happened, but it took about 3/4 of the novel to get to the point where I learned the outcome.  So, while not necessarily a bad thing, I kept getting impatient.  BUT I resisted reading the ending first.  I sure wanted to though!

One side note that I very much loved about The Admissions ~ Angela is in an AP Honors Lit class and is constantly using SAT words to replace cliched phrases and average words.  I learned a few new words just reading The Admissions; words like piquantengagingly provocative; indefatigableincapable of being fatigued; ignominydeep, personal humiliation and disgrace. {definitions from Merriam-Webster}

[Tweet “College admissions + family drama + long-held secrets = humorous, provocative novel”]

Recommended for readers who enjoyed Everybody Rise by Stephanie Clifford or Where’d You Go Bernadette by Maria Semple or warm, humorous, modern-day family dramas.  The Admissions will have you looking at your own family problems in a whole new way.   It will also have you reminding family members that the fall out from any secret kept is much worse than the fallout from admitting something up front.  The takeaways from this novel are spot on!  I know I was thankful to a. not live in an upscale suburb of San Francisco, b. not be a teenager ever. ever. again. and c. that all families have problems, just different ones.

Learn more about the author at MegMitchellMoore.com.

The Admissions is included in the She Reads “Books of Fall.”  Visit SheReads.org to read what other bloggers are saying.

Many thanks to NetGalley for providing me a copy to review.

 

 

Divider